Ashville Citizen-Times
Theater Review: Dating has hilarious results in Flat Rock's 'Love List'
By Tim Reid, Senior Writer, Aug. 26, 2004

FLAT ROCK - A frustrated bachelor conjures up his dream girl in Flat Rock Playhouse's latest Norm Foster comedy, "The Love List." But the old warning about "Be careful what you wish for" proves true with hilarious results. Leon (Peter Thomasson) surprises his best friend by signing him up for a dating service run by a gypsy woman. Bill (David Lutken) protests greatly but obviously needs something to jump-start his social life. The 50-year-old civil service worker is consumed by his job, spouting statistics and studies while facing a lonely future. Bill's wife divorced him seven years ago, complaining he was too boring, and he almost never dates. Leon, a semi-successful author who has been married to the same woman 24 years despite his numerous affairs, is determined to help his friend through the Got a Match dating service. All Bill has to do is fill out a list of the top 10 characteristics he's looking for in a woman - no small task since he is filled with misgivings and doubts that anyone will find him attractive.

David Lutken, Stephanie Wahl and Peter Thomason star in "The Love List," a comedy about dating, now on stage at Flat Rock Playhouse in Flat Rock. Photo by Steve Dixon But the two complete the list, citing everything from a sense of humor to passion, and suddenly Bill's world is turned upside down as Justine mysteriously enters his life. It is as though he has stepped into some alternate reality as Bill finds he has this beautiful, sexy girlfriend who worships him and embodies all the traits on his "love list."

It is as though he has stepped into some alternate reality as Bill finds he has this beautiful, sexy girlfriend who worships him and embodies all the traits on his "love list."

Stephanie Wahl is delightful as Justine, who would rate a perfect 10 on any bachelor's list. She can be passionate - inviting Bill to slip into warm tub with her - and intelligent, hanging on his every word about statistics and work.

Leon and Bill are astounded at his good fortune but can't resist the idea of tinkering with their creation by changing some of the items on the list. The results turn this bachelor's dream into a nightmare.

Both men learn real relationships are built on more than self-gratification, and the audience gets a lot of laughs in the process.

This is Flat Rock's ninth play by Foster and one of his funniest. Director David Matthews and a talented cast produce a solid evening of entertainment.